Bookmark and Share

Community (American Garage)

Subject View

SUBJECT: New Yes / Old Yes Back to Subjects
Tom Rudd
Feb 17 2011
at 10:31 AM
Has anybody seen the reincarnation of this band. How does the New Yes compare with the Old Yes. More importantly are they worth seeing.? The reviews are very good. Just wondering, I am a huge Yes fan and they are playing in Boston at the House of Blues.
Login to Post
From: Message:
radpiano
May 05 2011
at 12:33 PM
Bookmark and Share If you have the opportunity to see an Acoustic Evening with Jon Anderson don’t miss him ! The solo show in Bethlehem on May 2 was just mesmerizing ! Sings all the old Yes Songs and music from Olias & Vangelis projects and new material. His voice is crystal clear, full of life and passion and his outlook on life is full of light & love. The stories are great too ! A simple and pure evening of his music and art.
bluepno
Apr 12 2011
at 5:56 PM
Bookmark and Share Just listened to "The Living Tree" twice through. It was exactly what I had hoped for. The master at the grand piano accented with orchestral synths. Jon sounds (kind of) like a latter day Billie Holiday. Full of emotion, small range and fine tunes to boot. A quality piece of work.
harn
Apr 03 2011
at 2:53 PM
Bookmark and Share Having severely written off the current line-up earlier in this thread, today I was curious to read that their new album is called "Fly From Here" presumably because they have resurrected the excellent track "We Can Fly From Here" as performed on the Drama Tour of 1980. Recently I bought the new reissue of the second (and overlooked) album by The Buggles "Adventures In Modern Recording" and what a sublime piece of sophisticated electro-pop it is too. We Can Fly From Here is on it as an extra track, originally written by Trevor Horn and intended as a Buggles track before Yes hijacked it prior to Horn returning to The Buggles in 1981 to finish the second album (Also on the album is "I Am A Camera" the original version of "Into The Lens" ). I’m now intrigued enough to give it a listen when it comes out although I don’t quite know how I’m going to do that because I’m not parting with money for it!
barley
Apr 01 2011
at 1:11 PM
Bookmark and Share I get up, I get down. Life.
tiny_tim
Apr 01 2011
at 9:32 AM
Bookmark and Share And you and I climb, crossing the shapes of the morning And you and I reach over the sun for the river And you and I climb, clearer towards the movement And you and I called over valleys of endless seas.... ahhhh, the end of a great Yes song.
bluepno
Apr 01 2011
at 8:35 AM
Bookmark and Share I remember receiving Fragile in one of those cardboard boxes the Columbia music club used to mail lp’s out in. That was the "first" time I signed up for those free platters of black lacquer. The music was truly amazing and fulfilling. I stopped the purchases of Yes albums after Relayer. Pat, Bill Evans, Miles, Chick and Coltrane showed up.
barley
Mar 31 2011
at 3:45 PM
Bookmark and Share Back on track. Listening to Fragile and Close to the Edge surely confirms that 71/72 was the time this group was at the summit. I know I’m old and biased, but Bruford took something huge when he left.
Tom Rudd
Mar 30 2011
at 12:23 PM
Bookmark and Share On another note, I think Lemmy w/Motorhead has still got it. ;-)
HAMBONE
Mar 29 2011
at 12:00 PM
Bookmark and Share Steely Dan is a perfect example,tokeyozi.I thought they were starting to show their age when I saw them in 05. But then they bounced back in 09 with a great show, both Don and Walt on top of their game. I’d pay to see them again, if the price was right. But then again, it’s hard to let go of the ones you like the most.
tokeyozi
Mar 27 2011
at 1:00 PM
Bookmark and Share barley, Keef’s quote was, at least imho, an appropriate response to remarks made by garagistas with respect to the aging of rock artists. I feel what Richards says is universal and the same statement could have been made by Sting, Gabriel, Springsteen, Neil, Becker and Fagen, Jon Anderson, Ian Anderson, you name them (and I’m forgetting a few ladies here). Most of them are 60+ now. And some of them now probably do sound “dreadful”. Arguably, both Yes and the Stones should have called it quits many years ago. But (reading Tom Rudd’s account on the Glimmer Twins) that’s all a matter of taste. Example, in 2009 I went to see Steely Dan; it was a SSSuperb concert, one of the best I’d seen in years. Above all, Fagen was in remarkably good shape vocally, the band was groovin’. I spoke to this friend of a friend only recently, and he thought it was a very very disappointing show, references to "old men" and all. So there you go.
barley
Mar 25 2011
at 2:20 PM
Bookmark and Share Ah, Keef. Good for him, he’s in the Rolling Stones not Yes. Watched a few clips on YouTube of the current Yes tour. Dreadfully sad.
tokeyozi
Mar 25 2011
at 4:21 AM
Bookmark and Share Finished Keith Richards’ autobiography ‘Life’ only recently. 67-year old Keef explains it fairly well in the very last chapter. “I can’t retire until I croak. Here’s carping about us being old men. The fact is, I’ve always said, if we were black and our name was Count Basie or Duke Ellington, everybody would be going, yeah yeah yeah. White rock and rollers apparently are not supposed to do this at our age. But I’m not here just to make records and money. I’m here to say something and to touch other people, sometimes in a cry of desperation: “Do you know this feeling?””
HAMBONE
Mar 24 2011
at 12:12 PM
Bookmark and Share I have seen many older musicians in concert throughout the years, and my spin on it is it depends on the musician. For example, another posting that was I recently reading and responded to was about Roy Haynes and his excellant condition at his current age(84?) I have seen Buddy Guy several times in recent years at his age and he is still in great form. And I am psyched because I have tickets to see Brubeck tomorrow night perform and he is still in very good shape at 90. Some musicians, like everybody else, age and can perfrom well into their lives better than other-- maybe rock musicians not as well because of the lifestyle that goes with the territory. But there are still some that are worth seeing.
Tom Rudd
Mar 24 2011
at 10:31 AM
Bookmark and Share Also in the defense of The Stones. I was fortunate to attend their last tour at Gillette Stadium. It was excellent. Crack side men, Jagger was totally on, Richards may look like a burnt out geezer, but he still has his signature sound that is his forever. In fact given the Sound & Technology of the equipment today they probably sounded better than they did years ago.
Dazedcat
Mar 24 2011
at 9:00 AM
Bookmark and Share The Rolling Stones get beat up because of their collective age, not because they can’t still play. The concept of being a "brand name" seems to be the norm now for most bands from the past era. Townshend/Daltrey drag a bunch of guys around with them and still refer to themselves as "The Who". That pains me beyond words, so Yes isn’t the only band doing this. Older folks won’t give up their past heroes easily so checks continue to be cashed I guess. I don’t know when this will finally stop either....maybe when my generation gets to nursing home age.
Matseriksson
Mar 22 2011
at 1:52 AM
Bookmark and Share The thing is when watching the "classic" lineup of Yes with Wakeman in it, on several dvd’s, even the old film of "Yessongs". It does seem that Wakeman seems the one to have the easiest time. Though much of their music are quite challeging to play at places, it seems that for each year it turns out harder for messr Howe, Squire and White. They do start to sound very trite, and contrived, and seems to have to fight each note a little bit more for each time. Not with Wakeman though. I can very well understand that Jon Anderson may not be able to reach them highest notes anymore, but hands to my heart, I’ve heard this too in his younger days. At the end of the live album that AWBH put out ages ago, JA’s voice is out of tune at several places at the end of Starship Trooper. I wouldn’t mind this in a live setting when poor monitoring can cause you to miss some notes, but to let it pass out on a official release is a little bit, well, to me at least...out. It has started to get a nostalgic act, and where the audience, sort of, goes "Well, isn’t it fun, and remarkable that they’re still at it..." like that they’ve turned into something of a show, that to prove that they still cut it at that age, and expect us to go wow! Like the opposite of a child prodigy. That you’re very impressed that a three year old kid can play like that. But only in this case, totally opposite, you’re impressed that such senior citizens can still do the same and you get impressed. That’s the only view and thing I can have left for Yes, but granted, it’s the same with the Stones, and everybody else really. And of course, such things should be allowed to exist, as long as there are people appreciating it. But I think the reason for appreciating it has shifted. It has gone from one thing to a completely different thing. But by my means, and views, it clearly is a cultural decline. I really side with Peter Gabriel when he reclined to do the Genesis full reunion back in 2004. He said "There are tribute bands who does it better today..."
Matseriksson
Mar 21 2011
at 7:09 AM
Bookmark and Share I agree that they’ve become a tribute band to themselves. Most people agree that the Stones should really call it a day. The thing is, when they eventually start to forget their parts, on more and more shows, and even no matter hwo much they rehearse, they start to forget it, no matter how uch they try. Now, this has happened to Chuck Berry, who still at 85 years old, just manages to play 20 minute sets, and forgets that he just had played a tune, and starts to play it again. And often forgets lyrics. I am not sure though, that Benoit David will forget any lyrics any soon, but I think the other ones will as well as parts. Each tune they play gets slower and slower on each tour, and they’re just resting on their laurels and haven’t made anything new in the last - 10 (?) years. Even if they will release something properly new by this summer, called "fly from here" I think I bail out. Yes has gone by its past date.
barley
Mar 19 2011
at 11:10 AM
Bookmark and Share I think Wakeman referred to it as "Toby’s Graphic Go-Cart".
Bob Meyrick
Mar 19 2011
at 4:52 AM
Bookmark and Share Dazedcat, your post prompted me to Google the "eating-curry-on-stgae" story. I found this from an interview on getreadytorock.com - "Manchester Free Trade Hall, ‘Tales from the Topographic Ocean’ tour, in the days when my roadie used to hide under my Hammond. Two good reasons, if anything went wrong he could fix it and he could also hand me up me beer and Scotch. Certain bits of ‘Topographic Ocean’ where I had little to do, just ‘plink plink’. We used to have these conversations and he said ‘Fancy a curry?’ but with all the noise I thought he said after the show. So, I said yeah, chicken vindaloo, bombay aloo, popadom. Ten minutes later I could smell curry and he’d only gone and got my order! So I was eating away whilst Chris (Squire) and Steve (Howe) did some intricate parts. Jon (Anderson) starts sniffing the air and comes over, ‘You’re eating a curry!’ So yeah it was true, but I didn’t leave the show as I have heard sometimes!"
john
Mar 18 2011
at 4:16 PM
Bookmark and Share Ah - mystical. Wasn’t her first name Tess?
Dazedcat
Mar 18 2011
at 11:42 AM
Bookmark and Share I don’t think Wakeman ever did mystical, did he? I remember way back during the Close To The Edge era he’d be drinking beer out of the can and smoking cigarettes while the rest of them were....doing other things.
tiny_tim
Mar 18 2011
at 3:58 AM
Bookmark and Share Hi John, very funny!!LoL Best, Tiny
john
Mar 17 2011
at 6:15 PM
Bookmark and Share Being married to a Sun Page 3 lovely went a long way to redressing the balance. Cheers John.
barley
Mar 17 2011
at 4:12 AM
Bookmark and Share Rick never subscribed to that nonsense anyway. He’s very entertaining on Just a Minute.
yossarian
Mar 16 2011
at 7:11 PM
Bookmark and Share Do you think that Rick Wakeman’s appearance on so many popular TV programmes (Grumpy Old Men etc) has damaged Yes’s mystical, fantastical aura?
dspollen
Mar 16 2011
at 3:00 PM
Bookmark and Share I’ve posted here before- I’m a huge Yes and Metheny fan. I’m currently collaborating on music with Jon Anderson and trying to turn him on to a bunch of Metheny stuff! I’ve done solo guitar arrangements of pieces from both YES and Metheny on my YouTube page: http://www.youtube.com/dspollen And check out Jon’s Facebook page to hear a Metheny- inspired acoustic medley of tunes from "Going For The One". Hope you enjoy them.
barley
Mar 14 2011
at 11:28 AM
Bookmark and Share Harn hits the spot again.
harn
Mar 12 2011
at 2:36 PM
Bookmark and Share tspallone, agreed about Anderson and Squire. However, although the very best material features Wakeman, they also managed some incredible work without him; The Yes Album and Relayer. The Symphonic tour was also one of the most moving Yes concerts I’ve attended and good old Rick wasn’t involved.
tspallone
Mar 11 2011
at 10:49 PM
Bookmark and Share Not buying the "New Yes". But, what IS the "New Yes". Im MY opinion, if the band is without either Anderson, Squire, or Wakeman, it doesn’t exist.
barley
Mar 08 2011
at 9:17 AM
Bookmark and Share Search "Yes Looking Around" on YouTube. A track from their first album in ’69. Groovy, late 60s pop. Mmmmm, nice!
tokeyozi
Mar 07 2011
at 3:38 PM
Bookmark and Share So, finally this turns out to be, uhm, a Yes/No contest. I can only say that up their fifth album (Close to the Edge) they were a superior symphonic rock band, imho. I do have Topographic Oceans and Relayer, but somehow I’ve always thought they were a little over the top. Can’t judge the records after that, as I simply stopped listening, time to move to different musical sources, like e.g. PMG.
thehague
Mar 06 2011
at 5:50 AM
Bookmark and Share Yossarian, what? You don’t like them?? Shame on you!!! LOL
yossarian
Mar 04 2011
at 5:50 PM
Bookmark and Share I’ve spent 35 years trying to get into Yes. It’s great that they are still trying to crack me. It’s got to the point where my brother went to their gig last year. He said it was great. But I’m still not getting it. I shall admit however that they are excellent. Although I don’t like them.
barley
Mar 03 2011
at 1:18 PM
Bookmark and Share dgaw, I think what my friend hague is saying is that you’re quite entitled to your opinion, thanks for the input, we get what you’re saying. Moving on now, there is a song on "Big Generator" circa 1987, called "I’m Running". It’s really very good, and pure Yes albeit updated from the 70s.
barley
Mar 03 2011
at 7:46 AM
Bookmark and Share I think he means Benoit David. Very confusing.
thehague
Mar 03 2011
at 2:49 AM
Bookmark and Share Dichtenwalner, David Benoit is a (smooth jazz) piano player, not a bandmember of Yes.
thehague
Mar 03 2011
at 2:48 AM
Bookmark and Share Dgaw, "unlistenable", "silly", "pretentious", "boring", these are all words by which you happen to qualify the music of Yes. Please understand others (like me) still like the old Yes music. Btw I repeat: haven’t heard anything new by Mozart and Bach lately (I know: they are not among us anymore) but I still listen with great pleasure and admiration to many of their compositions. "Old" is in the mind, not in the art.
hman01
Mar 02 2011
at 7:28 PM
Bookmark and Share I highly recommend "The Six Wives of Henry the Eighth" by Rick Wakeman. And as for Yes being boring,how could that possibly be? Different strokes for different folks I suppose.But,some folks are probably more into seeing Charlie Sheen unravel.To paraphrase-I’m on a drug-It’s called Hman01.
transcendentman
Mar 02 2011
at 6:21 PM
Bookmark and Share anyone listen to brad meldhau, does a nod to yes on one of his releases
dlichtenwalner
Mar 02 2011
at 6:14 PM
Bookmark and Share I rank YES in my top five rock bands ever, with Close to the Edge being one of my top three rock albums all time. Thehague is right-on! Guitar-wise Steve Howe is as game-changing as Pat Metheny; completely unique player that has many followers including Steve Morse, Alex Lifeson, and countless others. I have not seen the new group, and it is hard to imagine the group without Jon, but David Benoit is probably a great and innovative chice I would think.
dgaw59
Mar 02 2011
at 4:20 PM
Bookmark and Share OK: Let’s have an adult conversation: Yes played some fine music 40 years ago- but what have they done of merit since say "Close To The Edge?" Tales of Topographic "Sleepiness", the 1980’s (which the fine keyboardist Wakeman even rejected.) The 1980’s disco version? Their efforts have been reviving and maintaining the Yes "brand" as opposed to writing or playing anything interesting or daring beyond retreads. Jon Anderson had a nice voice once, but the tunes are lyrically silly, Howe has talent but that trebly tone is unlistenable-Squire is a great bass player-has he played w/other folks or done other solo projects-Alan White? Heavy-handed w/no imagination unlike Bruford. Wakeman is talented and was smart enough to retire. If they are going to tour as a "cover band" at least try/write something different-like our hero PM. I appreciate your right to disagree but name-calling is beneath your potential...
thehague
Mar 02 2011
at 1:35 PM
Bookmark and Share I’d say one word for who said that: ignoramus.
dgaw59
Mar 02 2011
at 11:13 AM
Bookmark and Share Thank you for the correction. Allow me to try again. How about: "pretentious melodies" or "nothing new" or "simply boring."
Pete_Vancouver
Mar 01 2011
at 1:39 PM
Bookmark and Share someone here said ,’two words , has-beens’ . I think you will find that that is in fact one word . hyphenation leads to reduction . in the realm of two words to describe these guys I would select ’timeless tunes’ or ’peerless players’ . Their music brings out the alliterative in me ! Here endeth the lesson .
barley
Mar 01 2011
at 9:34 AM
Bookmark and Share Chris Squire’s solo album from 1975 "Fish Out Of Water" is pretty good too. Classic prog with Moraz on organ and Bruford on drums and a small chamber orchestra!!
harn
Mar 01 2011
at 7:31 AM
Bookmark and Share Jazziz22, none of the artists you mention have been replaced by an impersonator in the way that Jon has in Yes.
jazziz22
Feb 28 2011
at 5:02 AM
Bookmark and Share Yes a tribute to themselves? Maybe so, but then I guess the Stones, Paul McCartney, even Frank Sinatra was, and many other artist that have been around awhile could be thought of that way ... well, if so, so what - more power to them for still being able to play for people/fans that still want to hear them ... Now I agree Yes without Anderson may take some time to get used too and it may end up not working, but I trust these guys figure something out or at least I hope so ...
bluepno
Feb 27 2011
at 7:58 PM
Bookmark and Share Thanks for the followup barley...an outstanding effort in Olias of Sinhollow.
barley
Feb 27 2011
at 1:03 PM
Bookmark and Share Blue, as far as I know Jon played all the synths, percussion and guitar. Vangelis helped with synth programming. Pretty much a "solo" effort.
bluepno
Feb 26 2011
at 4:44 PM
Bookmark and Share Olias...a fine little piece of music. There are no musician credits on the album or at allmusic. Did Jon play all the instruments except for the orchestrations?
harn
Feb 26 2011
at 2:30 PM
Bookmark and Share Band names seem to mean nothing anymore, as long as there is some loose connection with the former band then it’s ok to use the name, stand out culprits who spring to mind are Thin Lizzy without Phil Lynott, Deep Purple without Blackmore or Lord and now Yes without JA. Sooner or later I think the Jimi Hendrix Experience will end up getting back together, why let the fact that all three are dead spoil a nice money spinner?...........
Bob Meyrick
Feb 26 2011
at 10:04 AM
Bookmark and Share For some different interpretations of Yes tunes, check out the Steve Howe Trio, with his son Dylan on drums and Ross Stanley on organ.
bluepno
Feb 25 2011
at 7:55 PM
Bookmark and Share I’m going to spin Olias and I will check back...I’ll be picking up The Living Tree soon. It is in limited availability for some reason. Rick Wakemans "Grunpy Old Man" series is fun. Check out his youtube solo piano renditions of Life On Mars and And You and I.
Dazedcat
Feb 25 2011
at 4:47 PM
Bookmark and Share No, I don’t believe he was thinking Mozart. I wasn’t either actually.
thehague
Feb 25 2011
at 3:25 PM
Bookmark and Share dgaw59, you mean: like - say - Mozart and Bach?
dgaw59
Feb 25 2011
at 1:53 PM
Bookmark and Share 2 Words: Has-beens...
Bob Meyrick
Feb 25 2011
at 12:49 PM
Bookmark and Share John, a few weeks after the Crystal Palace event BBC2 had an In Concert programme featuring Mahavishnu. Seeing McLaughlin up close was a revelation, and Cobham had those transparent Fibes drums. A fortnight after the Crystal Palace I was at the Rock at the Oval concert, which had Frank Zappa’s Hot Rats Grand Wazoo Orchestra headlining, with Jeff Beck, Hawkwind, Man... happy days!
barley
Feb 25 2011
at 12:35 PM
Bookmark and Share Tom, "Olias" is lovely. Well, it was lovely in ’76! A bit dated now obviously, but I enjoy a trip down memory lane when all the lights are green.
tiny_tim
Feb 25 2011
at 7:56 AM
Bookmark and Share JA’s voice - I adore all octaves of it...
Tom Rudd
Feb 25 2011
at 7:50 AM
Bookmark and Share I have heard Jon Anderson’s solo recording "Olias of Sunhillow" is a Masterpiece. Can anyone vouch for that?
thehague
Feb 25 2011
at 1:06 AM
Bookmark and Share I guess many of us have fond memories of Yes gigs in the past. I know I do! Yes is no Yes without Jon imo. His voice (whether you like it or not) is unique and an essential part of the Yes sound.
john
Feb 24 2011
at 4:14 PM
Bookmark and Share Ah Bob. Yes at the Garden Party changed my life completely in musical terms. I’d gone of course to see Yes and it was the Mahavishnu Orchestra that had such an impact on me. I couldn’t quite get my head around what was happening on stage but hearing Inner Mounting Flame a few months later, it all made complete wonderful sense. Cheers John
Pete_Vancouver
Feb 24 2011
at 1:23 PM
Bookmark and Share I may have posted this once before but i still get a kick out of thinking about it : i recall their Topographics Oceans tour when Rick Wakeman was so bored during one of the non- keyboard instrumental solos that he ordered out for a chicken curry and proceeded to consume as the dry ice machine wafted the smell over to (vegetarian) Anderson’s part of the stage . Rumour has it that the great keyboardsman proferred a poppadom to placate him later . Legends in their own lunchtime indeed .
barley
Feb 24 2011
at 10:58 AM
Bookmark and Share "Yes have become a tribute to themselves." Harn, a brilliant phrase. So true. And rather sad.
mksone
Feb 24 2011
at 10:24 AM
Bookmark and Share I consider myself lucky to have witnessed the ’77 touring version in the round, and the ’94 touring version of Yes and both were superb in their own ways. I give them credit for trying to create new music if music making is not possible with John, for whatever reasons, at this point. If you want the old, there are always the recordings. Though the Yessongs lineup my be my favorite, a new CD is in the works, let’s see what comes together I say. What IS surprising is Steve Howe going the Line 6 route for his sounds. To my ears it’s still more of a snapshot of a tone, though they are getting closer with modeling.
harn
Feb 24 2011
at 7:29 AM
Bookmark and Share No matter how good they are, Yes have become a tribute to themselves. Yes without Jon is unthinkable. Drama was good but not a Yes record to my ears.
barley
Feb 23 2011
at 3:30 PM
Bookmark and Share For the record: Vocals- Anderson, Horn, David. Guitar- Banks, Howe, Rabin, Sherwood. Keyboards- Kaye, Wakeman, Moraz, Downes, Khoroshev, Brislin, Wakeman (Oliver). Drummers- Bruford, White.
barley
Feb 23 2011
at 3:07 AM
Bookmark and Share Original Yes line up: Jon Anderson, Chris Squire, Bill Bruford, Tony Kaye, Peter Banks.
HAMBONE
Feb 22 2011
at 12:29 PM
Bookmark and Share While we reminisce, I recall a blazing hot outdoor fest at the old JFK stadium in Philly , summer of 76.Pousette-Dart Band, Gary Wright and Frampton all played before the sun set. Once the sun went down, Yes came onstage and it cooled off. From my view atop the stadium I could see trash cans being lit and the fire department outside the gates. The show had to be stopped until order was restored. Ah, the good old days!!
Tom Rudd
Feb 22 2011
at 10:41 AM
Bookmark and Share I was under the impression Steve Howe, Chris Squire and Alan White were on this 2011 tour. and the poster is correct you really can’t compare. Since I missed Yes with the original line up, I’m sure I would enjoy this facsimile.
bluepno
Feb 21 2011
at 7:28 PM
Bookmark and Share One of my first concerts in New Haven Connecticut....The Firebird Suite....the giant plastic mushrooms and one great music event...Yes back in the mid ’70’s.
Bob Meyrick
Feb 21 2011
at 3:29 AM
Bookmark and Share While we’re in nostalgia mode... The first large scale outdoor music event I attended was the Crystal Palace Garden Party #5, 2nd September 1972. Yes were the headliners and were premiering Close to the Edge, with new drummer Alan White. Geordie folk-rockers Lindisfarne were second on the bill, and third in the batting order were the Mahavishnu Orchestra! Seeing them was a "road to Damascus" moment and the start of my ongoing infatuation with jazz and jazz rock. The also-rans were Gary Wright’s Wonderwheel and Capability Brown. http://www.ukrockfestivals.com/Garden-party-72.html
barley
Feb 20 2011
at 4:11 AM
Bookmark and Share Ah Pete! New Bingley Hall? Lovely. Interestingly Yes only have one founder member still in their ranks, Chris Squire. They have had 6 or 7 keyboard players through the years, 3 guitarists, 3 singers, 2 drummers. The personnel changes have been constant but the live music has always been good. The symphonic concerts were really impressive. I still maintain they peaked in 1972 with "Close to the Edge", a few gems after that but never matched overall. Yes without Anderson’s voice isn’t really Yes. Squire knows this and has employed an impressionist. Seems to work.
jazziz22
Feb 20 2011
at 2:56 AM
Bookmark and Share Pete I couldn’t agree more with you concerning the Symphonic concert - one of the best live concerts on DVD I’ve ever seen ... take care
Pete_Vancouver
Feb 19 2011
at 11:43 AM
Bookmark and Share Yes in the affirmative by the look of it ! Its so refreshing to see an act of this longevity and stature continue to deliver music of such high quality ( messers Jagger and Richards take note please ) . I lost my ( gig- attending) virginity to these guys in a converted barn in Stafford England , and despite creeping up on fifty this year i can recall the occasion with the clarity of those laser beams that accompanied Parallels and Close to the Edge , over the heads of those in attendance . On a slightly unkind note , i have often thought that Steve Howe and Lyle mays would make a fine core to a new supergroup called Rock Cadavers , but who am I to talk . I heartily recommend Yes’ 2000 symphonic collaboration with the Dutch to anyone interested . These guys must be closing in on 45 years together without serious personnel implosion . Maybe there’s hope for all of us . Grand stuff , musically and anthropologically .
webtrotter1958
Feb 18 2011
at 7:11 PM
Bookmark and Share folks...recently they ve been in Buenos Aires and other cities of Argentina.I attended one show at BA, with my three boys (19yo, 15yo,10yo):the setlist was great, the playing was great, the singing was ok.I know that Jon is THE VOICE OF YES, but...I thought before the show that, having seem them once in ´85 -another lineup once again- this was a great chance of bring my memories to life! so, that was my spirit there.My son León (15) did the rest.he was so excited about hearing Steve Howe playing live! and he put me right on focus: One Yes show beginning with Siberian Kathru is a very thrilling moment! he said. And when the show begun, the guitar of Steve playing the intro of Siberian..., I looked at León face: it was happiness.so, my humble opinion is: you don t need to compare, just enjoy the presence of these old friends, and the beatiful music they play.(sorry for the sure made mistakes, long time far from english reading and writing is the cause...).Regards from far south!
tiny_tim
Feb 18 2011
at 2:38 AM
Bookmark and Share I a with Tom on this one too. They are playing this Fall 2011 in the Hammersmith, although I have never seen them live. Well, tickets were bought for a an Oklahoma City gig in around 1976, after a long camp out the night before to get the front seats, but the show was canceled. I can understand the new Canadian singer, replacing Jon Anderson, is right on the money for voice, but I just got to think that JA’s presence is about as much would except for a real Yes line up. His presence and song writing skills and lyrics in the group was colossal. Standing angelic on stage in front of the followers...
Login to Post